Monday, February 12, 2007

Switched to Mac OS

I'm a statistics... I just got a Macbook and will likely use it as my main development platform soon. So far, moving from Windows XP to Mac OS has been fairly painless. I have not done any Python programming but did try out Crunchy and Rur-ple. I found out that Crunchy requires Python 2.4+ (I had 2.3.5 installed on the Mac), that it does not work with Safari, and that there is a "bug" so that the "tooltip" does not work with Firefox on the Mac. I was planning to bring my Macbook to Pycon but will have to reevaluate as I'd like the Drunchy demo to go as smoothly as possible. There also does not appear to be a sound module on the Mac similar to winsound or ossaudiodev... I also found a new bug with rur-ple, but have no time to look into it before Pycon.

Not having taken side in the emacs/vim religious war, I have to find a decent programming environment. On my PC, I used SPE which I really liked but I have read a lot of good things about textmate and nothing negative (other than the fact that it is not free). Any advice from Mac/Python users?

6 comments:

Kyriakos said...

I know i'm probably being Cpt. Obvious here but this http://www.python.org/download/mac/ and that http://www.pythonmac.org/ should be enough to get you started.

André said...

Kyriakos:

I did use the first link, to get the latest Python version (which I used to find the bug with Crunchy/Firefox on Mac OS) and have visited the other link (plus a few others).

beorn said...

I use DarwinPorts to get my hands on (and later easily upgrade) newer versions of Python, Postgres, etc. TextMate is a great code editor; I don't miss Emacs. vi is off course available in the base system.

Blake said...

I usually use TextWrangler. It's not an IDE, it's just an editor, but it seems to work for the minimal stuff I'm trying to do.

Oh, and Eclipse ("The Emacs of Tomorrow!" ;) for when I want to debug/trace into stuff. I know, it's big, it's heavy, it's ugly, it's not Mac-ish, but I have to use it for my day job, so it's familiar, and it does get the job done.

Daehyok Shin said...

Recently, I tried Komodo Edit. It is free and surprisingly good. It is available on Windows, Mac, and Linux.

Andrew said...

I'm on ubuntu, and use Pydev for eclipse its pretty good